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Anxiety and the ADHD Woman — Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D.

Clinical Anxiety affects approximately 30% of people with ADHD. Many times, the anxiety is a direct result of ADHD symptoms. Other times, the anxiety is independent of the ADHD, but can exacerbate ADHD symptoms. Women with ADHD can experience significant anxiety, whether it is at work, as a parent and/or as the executive manager of the household. Learning the signs of anxiety and practical ways to manage it is important for one’s overall health and well-being.

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Description

Clinical Anxiety affects approximately 30% of people with ADHD. Many times, the anxiety is a direct result of ADHD symptoms. Other times, the anxiety is independent of the ADHD, but can exacerbate ADHD symptoms. Women with ADHD can experience significant anxiety, whether it is at work, as a parent and/or as the executive manager of the household. Learning the signs of anxiety and practical ways to manage it is important for one’s overall health and well-being.

 

About Roberto Olivardia, Ph.D.

Dr. Roberto Olivardia is a Clinical Psychologist, Lecturer in Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, and Clinical Associate at McLean Hospital. He maintains a private psychotherapy practice in Lexington, Massachusetts, where he specializes in the treatment of ADHD, OCD, and Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). He is an internationally recognized expert in eating disorders and body image problems in boys and men. He has appeared in publications such as TIME, GQ, and Rolling Stone, and has been featured on Good Morning America, EXTRA, CBS This Morning, CNN, and VH1. He has spoken on numerous radio and webinar shows and presents at many talks and conferences around the country. He currently sits on the Scientific Advisory Board for ADDitude Magazine and serves on the Professional Advisory Boards for Children and Adults with ADHD (CHADD), the Attention Deficit Disorder Association (ADDA) and the National Association for Males with Eating Disorders. He is an active member of Decoding Dyslexia-Massachusetts, an advocacy group promoting the needs of individuals with Dyslexia.

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